Review: KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD – ODDMENTS

There are so very few bands in modern music as hard working and dedicated as King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard. Cast your mind back to the late ‘60s, early ‘70s, you smelly hippies, to when the Rolling Stones were pumping out two to three records a year to please their growing fanbase. Yes, that was a long time ago and the music industry has become a different beast. Now, Melbourne’s King Gizzard have effortlessly released their fourth studio album in less than 18 months.

Just as I was still digesting last year’s excellent Float Along – Fill Your Lungs, King Gizzard surprised fans with another studio effort. Although it may be their fourth attempt in just over a year, the band are as fresh and dynamic as ever. Let’s have a breakdown of the group’s ever-growing discography: their debut 12 Bar Bruise was an extension upon King Gizzard’s garage, psych, noise EP that furthered ideas and deepened textures; Eyes Like the Sky was a frivolous change in the resulting in a spaghetti western suitable to soundtrack Django Unchained; the abovementioned Float Along – Fill Your Lungs is arguably King Gizzard’s most vivacious piece of work to date with its courageous 16-minute opener and its further seven beach/psych jams.

Oddments, as the name might suggest, is a semi-collection of old demos and re-workings from the band’s previous material. The album wastes no time in picking up where Float Along left off with the frantic opener Alluda Majaka throwing you straight into a Bollywood chase scene. Hot Wax brings some harmonica back from 12 Bar Bruise and is warmly welcomed in this reverb-frenzied show off between Mackenzie’s Ty Segall impression and guitarist Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s falsetto.

While Oddments isn’t revolutionary for the band, it serves as a captivating reminder of just how lucky we are to have such hard working, talented psych rockers in our country. If Vegemite – “I love, I love my vegemite / It’s strong as hell and black as night” – doesn’t become our national anthem in the foreseeable future, then there is no hope for our children.

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