We chat to women in Gold Coast Music ahead of International Women’s Day

There’s some incredibly talented women leading the charge in Gold Coast music right now and we’re not just talking about the ones on stage. It’s like there’s a new guard – a posse of bold, smart, sassy women who have taken charge of their own music careers as well as the wider music sector here. It’s bloody wonderful to see and we wanted to get to know them a bit better.

Let us introduce you to some of the women who make Gold Coast music so epic.

Hannah Morrison: Singer-Songwriter and Project Officer for SEED at the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University

 

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

Kate Miller-Heidke is one of the main reasons I decided to pursue a career in music. After watching her perform at Woodford Folk Festival, I was hooked. I really admired her fiercely unique songwriting and her confidence on stage. Since then, I’ve loved seeing the diversity of projects she’s worked on – super inspiring. While I wouldn’t say my music is like hers, Kate makes me want to be more fearless and unapologetically myself when I write music, and for that I will always be grateful. IMAGE (c) Savannah van der Niet. hannahrosamusic.com.

 

Eliza Klatt: Frontwoman of indie rock band Eliza & the Delusionals

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

For as long as I can remember, Hayley Williams of Paramore has been my biggest inspiration. Everything from her writing to her style to her onstage presence has been a huge influence on me as a musician. I remember first hearing their music when I was 13 and falling in love with Hayley’s voice, and I admire how she has inspired so many women around the world over the past decade. facebook.com/elizaandthedelusionals.

 

Millie Perks: Frontwoman of young, alternative band Ivey

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

I grew up listening to people like Etta James, Tracey chapman, Aretha Franklin, Nina Simone. So I feel internally they play a massive part in my lifes, as role models and inspirations. As I progressed I found myself listening to Fleetwood Mac, The Divinyls, The Preatures who all had hard hitting front women which I think really helped me grow as a musician and performer. Every time I listen to them it gives me motivation to sing louder, perform better and be the best woman I can be. IMAGE (c) Kyle Butcher. iveytheband.com.

 

Tamie Bennett: Founder of entertainment company Wedge Head Events

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

In the four years I have been running Wedge Head Events I have come across so many independent and inspirational women I can honesty say that each and everyone of them have influenced me in one way or another. They are so driven and passionate about their careers and always find a way to empower other women, I think it’s amazing.
No matter what age or avenue of the industry they are pursuing, they have taught me more than they realise and I am so thankful. instagram.com/wedgeheadevents.

 

Mindy Davies: Co-producer of Sofar Sounds Gold Coast and multidisciplinary performance artist.

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

There are so many incredible inspiring women in music, some that I am lucky enough to work with on projects like Sofar! Nina Simone has been a lasting inspiration for me growing up and she continues to always stay on my playlist. I am particularly drawn to women who aren’t afraid to talk about and question the structural inequalities that exist in our world. Along this line I recently had the pleasure of seeing Sampa The Great, her lyrics and poetry took me on an emotional and intellectual journey. Her music is inspiring because she talks about political and societal issues but puts a positive lens on them that I feel really motivates change. sofarsounds.com/gold-coast

 

Alice Conway: Marketing and entertainment manager at NightQuarter

Tell us about another woman in music who’s inspired you and why

I am inspired by many women in Australian music right now. So many are playing loud, calling out the status quo and making their voices heard. It’s hard to pick just one! Both onstage and backstage, I definitely admire Jack River. Her music is badass, and she’s not waiting for someone to give her permission to be heard. She’s creating her own festivals, turning the volume up loud and empowering women to see that our work and our art deserves the headline. nightquarter.com.au

 

Jodie Maloney: Frontwoman for alt rock band Nowhere Else, and multi-instrumentalist with electro act PurpleZain

Tell us… if you could change one thing about Gold Coast’s music scene, what would it be?

I’d like to see increased Government support and loosening of regulations for development of new creative spaces. The success of Miami Marketta, Night Quarter and now Mo’s Desert Clubhouse has shown there is a huge calling for this type of venue. With such a broad range of talent on the GC there is sufficient need and want for more venues, of varied capacity, that cater for diverse styles of music. There is definitely an opening in the southern Gold Coast, evident in the music lovers that converge on Eddie’s Grub House any night of the week for their music fix. IMAGE (c) Tracie Tee Live Events. facebook.com/purplezain/

 

Julia Bridger: Producer at Bleach* Festival and The Farm

Tell us… if you could change one thing about Gold Coast’s music scene, what would it be?

We’ve got such a vibrant and varied scene on the GC but I think, mainly due to our geography, the different genres tend to stick to their particular area of the coast. I think the next step is more cross pollination and collaboration of the existing scenes. It’d be great to hear exciting new sounds that could come from that. bleachfestival.com.au

 

Mel De Regt: Music director and Miami Marketta and Artist manager for Sunrose and Thee End Less.

Tell us… if you could change one thing about Gold Coast’s music scene, what would it be?

I think the misconception of what live music actually is. It doesn’t fit in a nice little box. It is developing and changing all the time, genres are being pushed into micro genres. Artists are and have always challenged the boundaries of creativity. WE as a live music city need to be able to move with these creative forces. Some bands just cannot play certain places because of the heavy noise restrictions. It’s a problem for artist and it’s a problem for venues. We need to find a compromise; otherwise we are not going to continue. miamimarketta.com

 

Teigan Le Plastrier: Frontwoman for Gold Coast punk rockers Being Jane Lane

Tell us… if you could change one thing about Gold Coast’s music scene, what would it be?

It would be awesome to see more live music venues closer to Surfers Paradise, and more of the venues supporting diverse genres. beingjanelane.com

 

Go ladies. We love you.

And happy International Women’s Day.

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